Seminole legacies could play huge role in Florida State’s future

Ron Simmons carries head coach Bobby Bowden off Florida Field
Associated Press via Tallahassee Democrat

The success that legendary Florida State head football coach Bobby Bowden created during his tenure elevated the Seminoles to a household name. The titles, top-5 streak, consecutive bowl appearances and appealing play style combined with his charisma and country charm made him an unstoppable force on the recruiting trail.

Under Bowden’s leadership, over 150 FSU players were selected in NFL drafts.

The groundwork laid by Bowden on the football field is why FSU is the national brand it is today, even with recent stumbles. And the groundwork laid on the recruiting trail all those years ago may pay huge dividends in upcoming classes as sons, nephews, and other relatives of past ‘Noles are making their own mark on the gridiron and will soon be taking their talents to the collegiate level.

These players are known as legacies. Fans only need to look in the recent past to see that such players are not a lock for Florida State (Devin Bush Jr.), while others choose to carry the family tradition of wearing garnet and gold (Stanford Samuels III).

Over the next three years, FSU could fill major needs with players that are FSU legacies.

2021 Legacies:

Branden Jennings, son of former FSU linebacker Bradley Jennings (97-01). The position of linebacker has had its share of ups and downs over the last few years. The last few classes have helped to restock the position, but the recent FSU commit is predicted to be an instant impact. Jennings delivers pain with every tackle and already has NFL size as a high school junior.

Corey Collier, son of former FSU linebacker Cornelius Collier (99-02). Florida State has never had difficulty signing defensive backs, but 6’2 ballhawks are not your average cornerbacks. Collier pulled down four interceptions this past season, including a pick-six. Securing Collier would be a huge win in recruiting as he currently plays high school football in Miami.

Marquis Robinson, nephew (as reported by Noles247) of former FSU running back Greg Allen (81-84). It’s no secret that Florida State’s current rotation of defensive tackles is one of the best in the nation, but next year? Next year has plenty of question marks with Marvin Wilson graduating and Cory Durden possibly leaving early for the draft. Marquis Robinson could step in and fill a major void and compete for early playing time. He’s already nearly 300 pounds and has the ability to create havoc in the backfield.

Shedeur Sanders, son of former FSU cornerback Deion Sanders (85-88). Coach Mike Norvell prioritized quarterback recruiting the moment he stepped foot on campus, flipping two quarterbacks for the 2020 class. The belief is FSU will attempt to sign two quarterback again in the 2021 class and one of those quarterbacks could be Sanders. Playing at Trinity Christian of Cedar Hill, Texas, Sanders has led his team to two straight state titles. This last season, Sanders amassed over 3,000 yards passing and 47 touchdowns through the air.

2022 Legacies:

Marvin Jones Jr., son of former FSU linebacker Marvin Jones (90-92). The sophomore linebacker is already 6’4, 190 pounds and is still growing. A former receiver, Jones has the ability to stop the run and drop in coverage. His strengths have led to lofty goals, as he stated in an earlier interview. If achieved, the sky is the limit for “Shade Bush”.

Julian Armella, son of former FSU defensive lineman Enzo Armella (91-94). Ask any Florida State fan about FSU’s biggest need and you’ll get the same answer: ““offensive lineman”... specifically, “offensive tackles.” Julian Armella is an early favorite to compete for a fifth star in recruiting rankings. And his highlights and mean streak lend support. There’s some of us on this site that believe if Armella was on the upcoming 2020 Florida State roster, he’d already be the starting left tackle.

2023 Legacies:

Lamont Green Jr., son of former FSU linebacker Lamont Green (94-98). Only a freshman, Green is already a stud on the football field. Green earned a spot on Max Preps Freshman All-American team after recording 80 tackles and 5 sacks during his ninth grade year. The 15 year old defensive end, nicknamed “Boots”, was also named Rising Stars’ Miami-Dade Defensive Freshman Player of the Year.

Landing a legacy is more than just improving the roster, it’s also a plus for optics. When these players are available, the school of their parents is assumed to be their destination. If the university secures their signature, it’s applauded but expected. Where as failure to land the legacy is seen as a “black eye”, whether legitimate or not.

Florida State could come up empty handed with these players. After all, the recruiting game is at times, a cruel mistress. But maybe, just maybe, the groundwork laid by Bowden, Mickey Andrews, and other Seminole greats will help establish the next great lineage of Florida State Seminoles.

***Author’s note: the same morning this article was released, 2022 tight end Jake Johnson announced on twitter that he received and offer from FSU. Jake Johnson is the son of former Florida State quarterback Brad Johnson (87-91). Tight end is also a position of need for FSU.

Comments

Great stuff, Tim

I’ve said it before and will say it again- Armella is the most important recruit for FSU in the past decade.

That is a strong statement....wow...coming from you, makes it believable....

You’d have to put me up among Enzo’s biggest fans back when….so sucked his injury, never forget him tomahawking on a gurney on the way to bambalance..(not good vibes,rather forget) but, will watch this kid for sure now.
What was that story exactly, someone pissed off Enzo in the locker room, wrestled him into, and busted the glass of Ron Simmons perpetual locker with instigators head? Or something to that effect????.

We want them all and we need them now!

Call the Doors or if not JGWentworth.

Rebuild the Dynasty!

Just need to put a product on the field they can buy into. No guarantees but it’s a nice part of our opportunities going forward. Go Noles,

Impressive is Armella. Understatement that is.

Yeah. Just saw this. Working to add. Great timing.

You are the man!

In the "it's a small world" department.

Was looking for live edge wood slabs for a countertop on Craigslist this morning. Found some in Bogart, Ga ( Jake Johnson’s hometown). In the middle of BFE about 15 miles from Athens.

Legacy recruits

It’s really great when legacy recruits are 4 and 5 star recruits. How do coaches handle the legacy recruits who are 2 stars? I assume there is a bit of a PR issue? can you afford to give away a scholarship for the optics?

Worked out OK with Fred Jones...

Yes it did.

But we didn’t offer *Deion’s first kid.
So I guess it’s a case by case basis, with the decision – whether right or wrong – being amplified.

*Deion may have had two kids we didn’t offer, I don’t remember.

Lots of times if the legacy recruit isn't talented enough to compete at a school, the coaches will use connections to help the recruit find other situations that are better fits

Guys like Rick Stockstill at MTSU have benefited from this kind of steering.

2022 commit Chad Mascoe is sort of a legacy

Mascoe’s dad, Chad Mascoe Sr., signed with FSU in February 2000 but did not make it in due to academics. But according to Chad Mascoe Jr., his dad remained a FSU fan even though he never played a down for the Noles. So the younger Mascoe is not really a legacy, but that connection to FSU has definitely helped in his recruitment.

Cool. Thanks for sharing.

When are all the Cromartie kids eligible?

Can’t believe it took so long for someone to mention this

Slackers.

Something like 2025-2045 or so.

Just hazarding a guess.

Gotta be like 2-3 per year for the next decade or so

My guess

Is any day now.

This article is so much fun

it feels like click bait.

I honestly don't understand these types of posts from our readers...you suggesting we write less of them?!?

Sometimes less is more. But sometimes less is less.

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